Khaled hosseini style of writing a thousand splendid suns review

Hosseini is skilled at telling a certain kind of story, in which events that may seem unbearable - violence, misery and abuse - are made readable.

Laila endures a number of beatings from the Taliban when caught alone on the streets in attempts to visit her daughter. The story evokes a feeling that not only leaves your hearts pained, but heals you at the same time. Mariam is a harami, born out of the illicit relationship of her father, Jalil, with a maid, lovingly referred by her as Nanna.

Staggeringly beautiful and deep and rich and sad and frightening and infuriating. But Hosseini vividly brings home what life is like for women in a society in which they are valued only for reproduction.

I remember watching them walking in pairs up the street, trailed by their children in ragged clothes, and wondering how life had brought them to that point I tire at the mere thought of writing it, and, besides, the suffering of this country has already been chronicled, and by pens far more learned and eloquent than mine.

Eventually we see her, orphaned and alone, allowing herself to become Rasheed's second wife. Set in Afghanistan from the s to the s, spanning from Soviet occupation to the Taliban control, following the lives of two women in their marriages and in their war-torn country.

I want to clarify that last remark because I think it goes to the most chilling aspect of the novel for me. Any simple reading of the novel, and subsequently of the Afghan characters that populate it, is thus teased out and then cast aside. The end, though a happy one, still leaves you desiring more and more.

And so shall you but not for the reasons you would expect. Though they are not related by blood, this book brings to question the concept of family and resilience: He marries Mariam through an arrangement with Jalil, and later marries Laila as well.

Laila is pregnant with her third child, and if it is a girl, Laila has already named her Mariam. War comes to Afghanistan, and Kabul is bombarded by rocket attacks. The lives of these women is an epic journey in every sense of the word and I felt like I was on a journey of my own as I road along with them.

In Kabul, Mariam becomes pregnant seven successive times, but is never able to carry a child to term. And yet they survived. Rasheed beats them and deprives them of water for several days, almost killing Aziza.

Behind the veil

Mariam is then taken to live in her father's house. But it is the plurality of the stories, with their shifting interrelations and discrepancies, that gives this novel its power. A Thousand Splendid Suns allows readers to fully comprehend of how women in foreign countries are being treated, and continue to be treated to this day.

The reader is invited to think that all these diverse characters must be similar, tied together as they are by their Afghan origins, before this assumption of similarity and stereotype is unravelled by the subtlety of the individual narratives.

I recommend this A Thousand Splendid Suns to one and all for it is truly a masterpiece. He is Editor-in-Chief at the Oxonian Review. Mariam is his illegitimate daughter, and she is prohibited to live with them, but Jalil visits her every Thursday.

Book Review: A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini A Thousand Splendid Suns recently celebrated its ten-year publication date in May of This book is not a new release, but an important book, especially for women, to read.

A Thousand Splendid Suns Review: A soul-stirring novel by Khaled Hosseini that takes into account the thirty year painful Afghan history with.

A Thousand Splendid Suns is a novel by Afghan-American author Khaled Hosseini. It is his second, following his bestselling debut, The Kite Runner. Mariam is an illegitimate child, and suffers from both the stigma surrounding her birth along with the abuse she faces throughout her marriage/5.

In a review of Khaled Hosseini’s second novel, A Thousand Splendid Suns (), Scarlett Baron noted the Afghan-born American novelist’s exploration of “Afghanistan’s relentlessly gut-wrenching recent past”. The word surfaced again as she commented on the way in which Hosseini “relentlessly exposes the injustices to which women are subjected”.

May 29,  · "A Thousand Splendid Suns" by Khaled Hosseini The life of the novel’s other heroine, Laila, who becomes Rasheed’s second wife, takes an even sharper trajectory toward ruin. A Thousand Splendid Suns is a novel by Afghan-American author Khaled Hosseini.

A Thousand Splendid Suns | Khaled Hosseini | Book Review

It is his second, following his bestselling debut, The Kite Runner. Mariam is an illegitimate child, and suffers from both the stigma surrounding her birth along with the abuse she faces throughout her marriage.

Khaled hosseini style of writing a thousand splendid suns review
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Review: A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini | Books | The Guardian